HISTORY

HST101 - Western Civilization I (to 1500) (3)

An introductory survey of the historical evolution of Western civilization from its ancient origins to AD 1500. This course introduces students to methods of and issues in historical investigation. Its comprehensive approach includes the study of social and economic elements, religion, philosophy, literature, art, politics, and institutional developments. PREREQUISITE(S): None

HST102 - Western Civilization II (since 1500) (3)

An introductory survey of the historical evolution of Western civilization from AD 1500 to the present. This course introduces students to methods of and issues in historical investigation. Its comprehensive approach includes the study of social and economic elements, religion, philosophy, literature, art, politics, and institutional developments. PREREQUISITE(S): None

HST107 - World History 1 (to 1500) (3)

This course will provide a survey of World History from the origins of humanity to the Fifteenth Century, just before the European "voyages of discovery" that brought the Americas and Pacific into contact with the rest of the world. It will focus on the development of major civilizations around the globe with a special interest in the political, economic, cultural and other ties between these civilizations. PREREQUISITE(S): None

HST109 - World History II (since 1400) (3)

This course will provide a survey of World History from the Fifteenth Century to the present. It will focus on the global contacts and connections created since Columbus's voyage in 1492 as well as on important political, economic, social and cultural trends that have contributed to the creation of the modern world. PREREQUISITE(S): None

HST110 - World Economic Geography (3)

The course provides a systematic framework for understanding the contemporary world that we now live in. It is a world of interconnecting countries possessing special combinations of natural, cultural, social, political and economic environments. The course will help the student to develop an appreciation of these countries and their individual impact on the rest of the world. This will lead to a better understanding of not only the old world order but, more importantly, the new world now evolving. The course breaks the world down into 12 geographical realms, each of which will be reviewed in detail. PREREQUISITE(S): None

HST120 - Diverse Cultures of the World (3)

The course provides the student with an understanding of the many cultures that make up the world we now live in. Today's world is a global world made up of people with diverse cultural backgrounds. It is important to recognize cultural sensitivities that exist in every society. Cross-cultural awareness and understanding are critical to meaningful relationships and for success in every walk of life. The course will look at culture, verbal and non-verbal communications, religion, and roles of women, and will include a survey of geographical regions such as North America, Latin America, Asia, Europe, Middle East, and Africa. Emphasis will be placed on the contemporary issues found in today's international environment. PREREQUISITE(S): None

HST200 - World History (3)

A one-semester, sophomore-level survey of world history, comprehensive in both chronology and geography. Principal concepts in geography, political science, economics, and the history of science will be featured. Designed specifically for Massachusetts state teacher certification needs, this course will emphasize Western civilization, including United States history and Massachusetts state history. PREREQUISITE(S): None

HST201 - U.S. History to 1877 (3)

A survey of the evolution of the United States from its colonial origins to the end of Reconstruction, this course explores the significant social, economic, intellectual, and political developments, including state history of Massachusetts. PREREQUISITE(S): None

HST202 - U.S. History since 1877 (3)

A survey of the evolution of the United States from the late 19th century to the early 21st, this course explores the significant social, economic, intellectual, and political developments during "the American Age" of global history, including state history of Massachusetts. PREREQUISITE(S): None

HST211 - European Integration (3)

This course will explore the topic of European integration from a variety of perspectives, including those of history, political science and sociology. The first half of the course will concentrate on the pre-history and history of the European communities leading to the creation of the European Union in November 1993. Then, it will look at the European Union's institutions and how they function, the relationship between the member states and the EU, and special issues that face the EU today. PREREQUISITE(S): None

HST231 - Introduction to Historical Research and Writing (3)

This seminar will introduce students to the basic issues and methods involved in the academic discipline of history. It will require them to write a paper based on independent research on a topic related to the theme chosen by the instructor for the seminar. PREREQUISITE(S): At least one 100- or 200-level history survey course plus sophomore standing or higher. Students must earn a grade of C- or better for this course to count towards their history major or minor degree requirements. Permission of instructor required if not a history major or minor.

HST232 - The Holocaust (3)

An analysis of the Holocaust, including examination of its causes and the conduct of it. Emphasis will be on the political, social, and moral issues involved in war and on the impact of the Holocaust on today's Jewish experience worldwide. PREREQUISITE(S): None

HST246 - Civilization of the Ancient Mediterranean (3)

A survey of major themes in the cultural history of the Ancient Mediterranean world, beginning with the near east and continuing through Greek and Roman civilization. These cultures were remarkable for the scope of their intellectual achievements, ambition and power. As a result, the study of classical civilization is the traditional basis of a liberal education, providing a vital understanding of the moral and intellectual roots of current ideas on morality, politics, language and literature. This course explores the history of the Mediterranean world from the time of Homer to the fall of the Roman Empire. Topics include: Greek and Roman mythology, the philosophy of Plato and Aristotle, Greek and Roman theater, Latin classics (Seneca, Cato, Caesar, Tacitus, Livy) and major styles of art and architecture. PREREQUISITES: None

HST301 - Knights, Popes, and Ladies: The Middle Ages (3)

A study of medieval Europe. This course will focus on the institutional, intellectual, and cultural aspects of the period, especially as they became the foundation for the Western heritage of today's world. Covering from late antiquity to the Italian Renaissance, the topics will include social and economic study as well. PREREQUISITE(S): Any 100- or 200-level history course or permission of the instructor.

HST303 - The Italian Renaissance (3)

A study of the cultural movement known as the Renaissance. Focus is on the Italian version of this movement; specific features to be examined include humanism, "new" scholarship, literature, and art. Though medieval in its origins, the Italian Renaissance marks the beginning of modernity; emphasis will be on its heritage today. PREREQUISITE(S): Any 100- or 200-level history course or permission of the instructor.

HST307 - Modern Germany (3)

This course will focus on German history from the late nineteenth century to the present. Topics covered include the creation of a German nation state in the form of the Second Empire in 1870-71; politics and society in imperial Germany; the origins of the first world war and the collapse of the empire in 1918; Germany's first experiment with democracy between 1918 and 1933; the rise of national socialism with its devastating consequences; the era of two German states after 1945, one on each side of the Cold War; and the unexpected peaceful reunification of 1989-90. PREREQUISITE(S): Any 100- or 200-level history course or permission of the instructor.

HST308 - The Cold War (3)

This course will examine the international history of the Cold War. Special emphasis will be placed not only on the rivalry between the United States and the Soviet Union, but also on how the entire world between 1945 and 1991 was influenced by the competition between the different ideologies and socio-economic systems that those countries represented. It also will suggest how the Cold War has continued to influence our present era. PREREQUISITE(S): Any 100- or 200-level history course or POL209 or permission of instructor.

HST311 - History of Warfare (3)

A general survey of the practices and purposes of war through the ages. Special attention will be given to theories of aggression and to reasons for war. Tactics, strategy, and major battles of great military commanders will be covered. PREREQUISITE(S): Any 100- or 200-level history course or permission of the instructor.

HST313 - The American Radical Tradition (3)

This course will examine the nature and significance of the American radical tradition from the American Revolution to the present-day. Among the radical philosophies and movements to be covered will be the American Revolution; abolitism; utopian experiments; womens rights; the labor movement; populism; socialism and communism; civil rights; Black power; feminism; the New Left; environmentalism; the gay and lesbian movement; and the global justice movement. Examination of the American radical tradition suggests that radicalism has been a persistent and significant feature of American history. PREREQUISITES: Any 100 or 200 level History course or POL105 or permission of the instructor.

HST315 - Special Topics (3)

An offering of topics that vary. Examples of past or anticipated future subjects include: Classical Mythology; Augustine to Chaucer; Medieval Literary Culture; Three Crowns: Dante, Bocaccio, and Petrarch; Women in Medieval and Renaissance Italy; The Scientific Revolution; The History of Italy. PREREQUISITE(S): Any 100- or 200-level history course or permission of the instructor.

HST321 - Preserving Our Stories: Method & Practice of Oral History (3)

This course will introduce students to the theory, methodology and practice of oral history research. As the primary requirement for the course students will record an interview with a family or community member using a standard oral history questionnaire and then transcribe and analyze their interview. With the permission of the interviewee the recording and transcribed interview will be donated to an oral history archive to be housed in the college library. PREREQUISITE(S): Any 100- or 200-level history course or permission of the instructor

HST323 - African-American History Since 1619 (3)

Topics to be examined will include slavery and racism, abolitionist and antislavery movements, Civil War and Reconstruction, Jim Crow, the Great Migration, the Depression and New Deal, World War Two and Cold War, Civil Rights and Black Power, and the impact of de-industrialization, unemployment and incarceration. Emphasis will be placed on the experience of African-Americans and their contributions to the development of a democratic society. Course readings will consist of relevant primary sources and recent secondary scholarship. PREREQUISITES: Any 100- or 200-level history course or permission of the instructor

HST325 - Twentieth Century America Since 1945 (3)

Topics to be examined will include the origins of the Cold War, the post-World War Two economic boom, the liberal and radical movements of the Sixties, the Conservative revival of the Seventies and Eighties, the end of the Cold War, and the impact of globalization and terrorism. Emphasis will be placed on the experience of ordinary men and women and their contributions to the development of a democratic society. Course readings will consist of relevant primary sources and recent secondary scholarship. PREREQUISITE(S): Any 100- or 200-level history course or permission of the instructor

HST327 - Twentieth Century America 1900-1945 (3)

Topics to be examined will include Progressivism, World War One, the Twenties, the Crash and Great Depression, New Deal and World War Two. Emphasis will be placed on the experience of ordinary men and women and their contributions to the development of a democratic society. Course readings will consist of relevant primary sources and recent secondary scholarship. PREREQUISITE(S): Any 100- or 200-level history course or permission of the instructor

HST349 - The Supreme Court in American History (3)

A study of the historical role of the U.S. Supreme Court and its impact on American society, including an examination of issues of political theory and major court cases. PREREQUISITE(S): Any 100- or 200-level history course or permission of the instructor.

HST351 - Twentieth-Century United States (3)

An examination of the evolution of the United States from the late 19th century through the early 21st, this course explores significant social, economic, intellectual, and political developments during "the American Century" of global history. PREREQUISITE(S): Any 100- or 200-level history course or permission of the instructor.

HST366 - History of Political Thought I (3)

This course surveys the ideas of leading political thinkers from ancient times to the Renaissance. Figures such as Plato, Aristotle, St. Augustine, St. Thomas, Ibu Khalduhn, and Machiavelli will be discussed. PREREQUISITE(S): Any 100- or 200-level history course or permission of the instructor.

HST367 - History of Political Thought II (3)

This course surveys the ideas of leading political thinkers from early modernity through to the present day. Figures such as Bodin, Hobbes, Locke, Montesquieu, Rousseau, Burke, Hegel, Marx, and Mill will be discussed. PREREQUISITE(S): Any 100- or 200-level history course or permission of the instructor.

HST368 - Modern European Political Thought (3)

This course surveys the principal currents of 19th and 20th century political thought in Europe. Included are Spencer, Green, Lenin, Trotsky, Mosca, Pareto, Sorel, and others. This course is not open to freshmen. PREREQUISITE(S): Any 100- or 200-level history course or permission of the instructor.

HST369 - American Political Thought (3)

This course is a study of the evolution of American political thought from 1776 to the present day, with special reference to the liberal tradition. Among the figures surveyed are Hamilton, Madison, Calhoun, Sumner, Dewey, Santayana, Skinner, Marcuse, and others. This course is not open to freshmen. PREREQUISITE(S): Any 100- or 200-level history course or permission of the instructor.

HST389 - Twentieth-Century World (3)

Designed as a reading seminar, participants will read some material in common at the beginning of the semester in order to provide a basic body of knowledge. The emphasis of the course will be independent readings on chosen topics within twentieth-century world history, to be reported on in open discussion with other participants throughout the semester. This course is repeatable for credit with an appropriate change of individual topics. PREREQUISITE(S): Any 100- or 200-level history course or permission of the instructor.

HST390 - Twentieth-Century Global History (3)

A systematic examination of world history from the international rivalries leading to World War I through the early twenty-first century. Emphasis will be on the political, economic, and cultural evolution of global society and the forces that unify as well as fragment that society. PREREQUISITE(S): Any 100- or 200-level history course or permission of the instructor.

HST392 - War, Diplomacy and Society, 1815-1945 (3)

This course will investigate the relations between the great powers from the nineteenth century through the end of the second world war. Special attention will be devoted to the two world wars and their origins. The course will also explore the relationship between diplomacy, socio-economic developments, and military strategy. PREREQUISITE(S): Any 100- or 200-level history course or POL209 or permission of instructor.

HST395 - Internship (3)

This course allows history majors to enhance their knowledge of historical research or of public history by designing their own internship at a local museum, archive, or similar institution. They will be required to work a regular number of hours (usually ten) each week during the semester. Besides fulfilling the expectations of their on-site supervisors, they must also write regular reports for their faculty supervisor. This course is offered every semester. It also may be taken over the summer if the internship opportunity is located outside of the greater Springfield area. In this case, it is expected that the participant will work a full-time schedule covering at least several weeks for their sponsoring institution. Students may take it only once for academic credit. PREREQUISITE(S): Majors or minors only, junior or senior standing. Internship must be arranged at least one semester in advance with the sponsoring institution and approved by the history department chair.

HST398 - Independent Study (1-3)

Students may pursue supervised reading and/or research in topics they find especially interesting, for one, two, or three credit hours. Advance arrangement and permission of the department chair required. PREREQUISITE(S): Junior or senior status and permission of the instructor

HST399 - Senior Project (3)

This course is the capstone experience for all history majors. They will select a topic in conjunction with the instructor and write a substantial paper on it based on independent research. It is offered every semester and may be taken either in the fall or spring of the senior year. PREREQUISITE(S): Majors only. Senior standing or permission of instructor.