PSYCHOLOGY

PSY101 - General Psychology I (3)

This course covers the basic principles of behavior, that make up the foundation of psychology. Emphasis is placed on the biological basis of behavior, sensation, perception, learning, language, memory, thinking, infancy, and childhood. The methods of inquiry used in psychology are also emphasized. PREREQUISITES: None

PSY102 - General Psychology II (3)

A continuation of PSY101, with an emphasis on the application of psychology to contemporary life. Topics include: motivation and emotion; social behavior; adolescence and adulthood; personality; abnormal behavior and psychotherapy; stress, health, and psychology of the workplace. PREREQUISITES: PSY101

PSY200 - Foundations of Psychology (3)

This course provides an overview of the fundamental skills to the study of psychology. Students should develop a better understanding of how to succeed in the major and psychology-related professions. (Recommended for sophomores).

PSY208 - Adolescent Psychology (3)

This course is a study of adolescent behavior, including current theories concerning the nature of adolescence. Emphasis is placed on physical, emotional, and cognitive forces, and how they interact to shape the adolescent personality. PREREQUISITES: PSY101

PSY210 - Health Psychology (3)

This course provides a comprehensive overview of the field of health psychology. It is an extremely useful course for those planning to enter the healthcare field. The focus will be on adults; however, pediatric issues will also be covered. This course will examine the history of health psychology, mind-body connections, the effects of stress, and behavioral factors in illness. More specifically, this course will examine coronary heart disease, hypertension, cancer, psychoneuroimmunology, chronic pain, obesity, and smoking cessation. General issues such as compliance with medical regimens and psychological disorders that may affect proper compliance with medical regimens will also be covered. PREREQUISITES: PSY102

PSY214 - Psychology of Human Sexuality (3)

Human sexuality is examined from biological, cultural, and psychological perspectives. Topics include sexual anatomy, childbirth, contraception, abortion, sexual development, sexual attitudes, adult sexual behavior, and alternative sexual lifestyles. PREREQUISITES: PSY102

PSY301 - Educational Psychology (3)

This course examines aspects of psychology related to human learning and the educational process. The course surveys topics such as learning, thinking, memory, intelligence, creativity, testing, motivation, and mental development that are vital to teachers and valuable to anyone engaged in learning. PREREQUISITES: PSY102

PSY302 - Statistics (3)

This course is an introduction to statistical methods as they are used in the social sciences. Both descriptive and inferential statistics are covered, including sampling, probability, and hypothesis testing. Specific parametric and non-parametric analyses include analysis of variance, the t-test, Chi-square, and correlation. PREREQUISITES: None

PSY304 - Abnormal Psychology (3)

This course examines the historical perspectives of abnormal behavior, and the nature, classification, etiology, and treatment of a variety of psychopathologies. Intended for majors in psychology, nursing, criminal justice, occupational therapy, physical therapy, special education, and human services. PREREQUISITES: PSY102

PSY305 - Psychology of Industry (3)

This course surveys industrial and organizational applications of psychology. Principles of individual differences are discussed that relate to career choice, career advancement, management, and the workplace environment. PREREQUISITES: PSY102

PSY306 - Psychological Testing (3)

This course surveys the available instruments, tests, inventories, and questionnaires in current use today. Emphasis is placed on the practical use of psychological measurements in education and psychological practice in business and industrial settings. The theoretical assumptions of assessment, the technical characteristics of good tests, and the systems of test score reporting are covered as they apply to the use of tests and test results. PREREQUISITES: PSY101; recommended for juniors and seniors only

PSY307 - Social Psychology (3)

This course examines human behavior as it is affected by various social situations. Topics include the study of attitudes, social attribution, altruism, aggression, group behavior, and interpersonal attraction, among others. PREREQUISITES: PSY102; recommended for juniors and seniors only

PSY309 - Developmental Psychology (3)

The purpose of this course is to examine the concepts of human development, from conception to old age. Specifically, the course looks at how physical, cognitive, and socioemotional factors interact to influence learning, intelligence, language development, and the growth of personality. Major theories and the research that supports or refutes them are examined. PREREQUISITES: PSY102 or permission of instructor

PSY312 - Personality (3)

In this course, theories and research directed toward understanding individual differences in thought, feeling and behavior are considered. Major focus will be on psychodynamic, humanistic, behavioral, cognitive, and trait perspectives. Psychotherapies will be examined as implementations of personality theory. PREREQUISITES: PSY102; junior standing

PSY315 - Experimental Psychology (4)

This is a laboratory course dealing with the nature of science and scientific research methods. Although the emphasis is on experimentation, quasi-experimental designs and other research methods are covered in detail. Students carry out research projects, analyze the results, and write APA-style research reports describing the research project. PREREQUISITE(S): PSY200 and PSY328 and PSY328L

PSY316 - Experimental Methodology (4)

In this course, the student conducts his/her own original research project under the close supervision of the instructor. The project encompasses all phases of the research endeavor from conceptualization of the question, through data collection and analysis, to the written report in the format of the APA. Especially recommended for psychology majors considering graduate school. PREREQUISITES: PSY315

PSY317 - Cognitive Psychology (3)

An introductory examination of the field of human cognition. Topics include perception, attention, short and long-term memory, problem solving, and decision making. Emphasis will be on understanding the scientific nature of the discipline. PREREQUISITES: PSY101

PSY322 - Physiological Psychology (3)

This course is an introduction to the physiological basis of psychology. It focuses on the human brain and nervous system as they relate to topics such as learning, memory, motivation, sensation, sleep, drugs, and mental disorders. PREREQUISITES: PSY101

PSY328 - Advanced Statistics (3)

This course is a continuation of PSY302, including a brief review of the material previously covered, such as probability, sampling, and hypothesis testing for both parametric and non-parametric analysis. Presented for the first time are such topics as Factor Analysis of Variance, the within-subjects Analysis of Variance, the paired t-test, and Chi-Square. PREREQUISITES: Students must earn a grade of C- or higher in PSY302 or its equivalent.

PSY328L - Advanced Statistics Lab (1)

An experiential lab to accompany PSY328, this course emphasizes the entry, calculation, and interpretation of statistical analyses using SPSS. Students will also learn and practice writing up statistical analyses in APA format. Exercises follow the statistical tests presented in PSY328. PREREQUISITES: Students must earn a grade of C- or higher in PSY302 or its equivalent. PSY328 should be taken concurrently with PSY328L.

PSY330 - History and Systems in Psychology (3)

This course addresses the roots of modern psychological thought and methodology, from their origins in philosophy and the natural sciences through the refinement of psychology in its current form. The major theories, schools of thought, and the people who have influenced the field of psychology will be examined. This course also serves as preparation for students who will be taking Graduate Record Examinations and for graduate study in psychology. PREREQUISITES: PSY315

PSY340 - Psychology Practicum (3)

Students are placed in off-campus settings such as detention centers, hospitals, senior citizen centers, alternative schools, and halfway houses. Journals are maintained reflecting the student's activities and reflections while at the practicum site. An academic paper with citations from psychological literature is required, covering some aspect of the practicum experience (i.e. client population, treatment approach, strategy for change, etc.). Detailed plans for the practicum are made in consultation with the instructor. A practicum completed in another department, which has an acceptable psychological component, may be used to fulfill this requirement. PREREQUISITES: Psychology majors and minors only, junior or senior status, and a GPA of 2.0 or higher. Register for PSY340 if taken in the fall semester and PSY341 if taken in the spring semester.

PSY342 - Topics in Psychology (3)

The Topics in Psychology course addresses special topics not ordinarily covered in other departmental courses and often provides students with cutting-edge insights and experiences. Topics will vary each semester based on the expertise of the faculty member teaching the course. Students will be expected to read current research and literature on the selected topic, engage in class discussions of the reading, and complete a course project. PREREQUISITE: PSY102; recommended for juniors and seniors only. Course may be repeated twice if different topics, up to a total of six credits.

PSY346 - Psychology of Aging (3)

Life cycle studies have recently focused upon the middle and older years of the life span. These studies have revealed that the declines in aging aren't as universal, precipitous, nor inevitable as previously thought; indeed, each decade in middle years has its theme and task. It has also been found that many of the changes we associate with old age actually began during earlier periods of life. The focus in this course is on the origin and nature of these individual changes and phases. PREREQUISITES: PSY102

PSY350 - Psychology of Death and Dying (3)

This course will focus on the many different aspects of death and dying. Some of the topics include: grief and bereavement, the hospice philosophy, children and death and dying, and AIDS. This course is appropriate for psychology and sociology majors, nurses and nursing students, gerontology students, and anyone interested in exploring this most fascinating subject. PREREQUISITES: PSY102

PSY356 - Psychopathology of Adolescence (3)

This course is designed for students to gain an understanding about specific psychological and psychiatric disturbances that afflict teenagers ages 13 to 21. Topics include teen depression, delinquent behavior, alcohol abuse, suicide and homicide, affective disorders, schizophrenia, eating disorders, and a brief introduction to family and network therapy. PREREQUISITES: PSY102

PSY361 - Teaching Assistantships in Psychology (3)

A number of advanced psychology majors are selected each semester by the psychology department to act as TAs (teaching assistants) in several undergraduate courses. The TAs are expected to deliver lectures, be involved in an active tutoring program, and to assist in both creating and scoring exams and quizzes; in short, to be involved actively in the total teaching process. PREREQUISITES: Junior or senior status and permission of the department chair

PSY365 - Senior Thesis (3)

The student works under the supervision of a faculty member in the preparation of a thesis, which may be based on empirical or other forms of research about a topic of interest to the student. Recommended for psychology majors considering graduate school. PREREQUISITES: Senior major status, GPA of 3.0 or higher, and permission of the instructor

PSY366 - Senior Thesis (3)

A continuation of PSY365. The student receives a single grade on the year-long project, with a temporary grade of "Pass" assigned at the end of the first semester. PREREQUISITES: PSY365

PSY398 - Directed Study (1-3)

Part one of a two-part course. In these courses a student pursues in depth an individualized program of reading and/or research with a specific faculty member. These courses may be repeated for credit with permission of the department up to a total of six credits. PREREQUISITES: Permission of chairperson of the department. Register for PSY398 if taken in the fall semester and PSY399 if taken in the spring semester.

PSY399 - Directed Study (1-3)

Part two of a two-part course. In these courses a student pursues in depth an individualized program of reading and/or research with a specific faculty member. These courses may be repeated for credit with permission of the department up to a total of six credits. PREREQUISITES: Permission of chairperson of the department. Register for PSY398 if taken in the fall semester and PSY399 if taken in the spring semester.

PSY401 - Group Testing (3)

This course focuses on developing an understanding of the nature and function of group assessments. This includes, but is not limited to, such areas as achievement, aptitude, interest, and vocation. The nature and purpose of tests such as the Massachusetts Comprehensive Assessment System as a requirement for high school graduation is also explored. Students will understand the issues of assessment norms, validity, and reliability, as well as general principles of test construction. Emphasis will be on the ability to interpret and integrate information obtained from assessment tools for the purpose of addressing student needs, and on communicating assessment results to students, parents, and teachers. PREREQUISITES: None

PSY402 - Behavioral Statistics (3)

Coverage includes descriptive statistics: central tendency, variability, transformed scores, graphing, skewness and kurtosis. Also included will be probability and inferential statistics, including z test, t tests (one and two sample), ANOVA, Chi square and the Pearson r. Basic preparation in mathematics is needed. PREREQUISITES: Preparation in math

PSY407 - Applied Research Methodology (3)

This course links statistical analysis and research methodology in order that the student may become a sophisticated research consumer as well as research producer. The student must learn to understand the logic of the research enterprise and have a basic grasp of the conceptual base on which the statistical tests of significance rest. Understanding research strategy and the logic behind the statistical tests is the underlying theme of the course. This will allow students to understand the nature of empirical research in developing education interventions and therapeutic strategies. Students are also required to learn the SPSS computer program. PREREQUISITES: PSY302 or PSY402 or its equivalent

PSY408 - Adolescent Psychology (3)

This course is a study of adolescent behavior, including current theories concerning the nature of adolescence. Emphasis is placed on physical, emotional, and cognitive forces, and how they interact to shape the adolescent personality. Students write a topical paper on some aspect of adolescence to gain a better understanding of the issues.

PSY409 - Diagnostic Psychoeducational Assessment (3)

The purpose of this course is to learn to carry out a psychoeducational assessment using appropriate assessment instruments and to write an effective report of the assessment. To achieve this, the class will become familiar with the particulars of testing and test administration, and will critique and study formal and informal tests and testing procedures in the areas of reading, math, language, attention deficit, and behavior. The influence and impact of standardized tests on groups such as racial, ethnic, cultural minorities, and English language learners will be explored. This course will deal with the techniques of synthesizing and integrating psychological and practical information into an effective report and educational plan. Emphasis will be placed on assessment techniques, an overview of presenting problems, the development of appropriate intervention strategies, the presentation of psychological reports, and consultation and collaboration with both parents and professionals. PREREQUISITES: None

PSY412 - Psychology of Behavior Management for Special Needs Children (3)

Basic behavioral measures and techniques involved in working with special needs children, including theory, assessment, materials, and problem remediation. Special attention is given to communication, observation, and group management skills. PREREQUISITES: None

PSY425 - Counseling Theory and Practice (3)

This course will examine in some detail the influence of psychoanalytic, interpersonal/social, cognitive, and behavioristic theories on present therapeutic techniques. Each style of counseling is evaluated and the relationship between the nature of the disturbance and the effectiveness of each approach is discussed. The response to counseling of those from various racial and cultural groups will be considered. Classroom discussion will be used in conjunction with film and audio tape presentations to translate theoretical understanding into effective counseling behavior. PREREQUISITES: None

PSY429 - The Juvenile Justice System (3)

An in-depth look at the juvenile justice system from its historical origins to current practices. Special emphasis is placed on juvenile justice terminology, landmark cases, and procedures used with juveniles and their families. The social, economic, and racial considerations of juveniles in difficulty with the law will be considered. PREREQUISITE(S): None

PSY470 - Applied Research in Criminal Behavior (3)

This course involves doing original research in the area of criminal psychology. Students will be involved in gathering data, statistically analyzing the data, and writing the results of the research project. Students in this course will work as a research team investigating the correlates, theories, personality characteristics, and possible explanations of criminal behavior. PREREQUISITES: PSY407

PSY471 - Advanced Practicum with Seminar (6)

The purpose of the practicum is to provide a culminating experience for the student in the School Guidance program in a school. The student is offered an opportunity to apply skills gained from course work in actual practice of guidance counseling. The student works under the direct supervision of a licensed guidance counselor with the assistance of a college advisor. The advisor helps the student to develop appropriate goals, to effectively use interpersonal skills, and to determine the areas to be further developed. Periodic meetings are scheduled with students and the college advisor as part of the practicum experience. The duration of the practicum is 450 clock hours, for which three credits are awarded. The clinical experience is a continuation of the practicum and builds upon the experience. At this point, the student is employable as a guidance counselor and works independently with school mentorship and college supervision. The clinical experience is 600 clock hours, for which six credits are awarded. PREREQUISITE(S): all prior coursework in program, passage of Communication and Literacy MTELs, GPA of 3.0, and approval of school district and AIC's Office of Field Experience.

PSY482 - Field Based Research in School Guidance/School Adjustment (3)

Description pending.

PSY483 - Principles and Practices of Guidance (3)

This is an introductory course designed to acquaint the student with the basics of the need, meaning, an ethics of guidance services. Issues related to school guidance practices, with an overview of the role and function of the school counselor, will be reviewed. Specifically, student scheduling, testing and assessment, career guidance, and college placement will be emphasized. Current trends in the field, as well as general guidance issues, will be explored. Emphasis will be placed on the fact that the guidance counselor serves as part of a collaborative team with a strong focus on consultation. PREREQUISITES: None

PSY488 - Occupational Information (3)

This course is designed to acquaint the student with vocational counseling practices. Sources of career information, lifestyle development, advantages and disadvantages of each source, and methods of storing and disseminating information will be explored. An understanding of career development assessment and career counseling techniques will be explored. Current issues in college planning and school-to-work transition programming will be explored. PREREQUISITES: None

PSY500 - Theory & Practicum - Diagnostic Assessment I: WISC and WAIS (3)

Provides a thorough understanding of the administration, scoring, and interpretation of both the WISC and WAIS. Subject analysis stresses an understanding of cognitive strengths and weaknesses. Scoring analysis covers comprehensive personality descriptions. Differential diagnosis is also integrated in the course from a treatment-planning perspective. A major emphasis will be placed on the proper administration, scoring, interpretation, and preparation of a written report based on the Wechsler Scales. In addition, direct and indirect assessment techniques will be covered. PREREQUISITES: None

PSY501 - Theory & Practicum - Diag. Assess. II: Pers. & Projections (3)

A continuation of PSY500. In this course, the student will be encouraged to develop a personal frame of reference around personality assessment. Specifics include an examination of several traditional and non-traditional diagnostic instruments such as the TAT and Rorschach. Problems involved in assessing dysfunction will be included, as well as the application of assessment and diagnoses to the selection of treatment modalities. PREREQUISITES: PSY500

PSY505 - Group Counseling (3)

The emphasis in this course will be on human growth and the counseling process within the group setting. Among the concepts included are curative factors, interpersonal learning, group composition, and tasks and techniques for change. Drug addictions, poverty, and education will be explored in understanding the individual response to group counseling. The class itself will experience these concepts by both participating in a personal growth group and reviewing appropriate literature. PREREQUISITES: None

PSY512 - Systems and Theories in Psychology (3)

This course traces the history of the major theoretical positions in psychology (structuralism, functionalism, behaviorism, gestalt, and psychoanalysis) from their epistemological, both rationalistic and empirical, and philosophical roots, dating from ancient Greece to the present time. Coverage will include discussions of the scientific method and the philosophy of science. Finally, contemporary positions, especially those involved in the cognitive revolution, will be covered from both the psychological and physiological points of view. Throughout these latter discussions, emphasis will be placed on the developmental aspects of human growth. PREREQUISITES: None

PSY514 - Psychology of Learning (3)

Intensive coverage of the major learning theories in psychology, and their epistemological roots in philosophy, both from the point of view of rationalism and empiricism. Emphasis, however, will be on the twentieth century and will include Pavlov, Thorndike, Watson, Guthrie, Hull and Skinner as behaviorist-associationists, and Wertheimer, Kohler, Lewin, and Bruner on the cognitive gestalt side. Bandura's social modeling theory will be stressed, including discussions of racial prejudice and attitude change. Piagets cognitive model will be stressed, including discussion of qualitative differences in learning according to developmental stage. Coverage will also include processing models, cognitive acquisition theories, and the basic models concerning the physiology of learning and memory. PREREQUISITES: None

PSY515 - Advanced Abnormal Psychology (3)

This course examines disorders in adulthood, adolescence, and childhood with consideration of the relationship between biological, social, psychological, and environmental factors, as well as problems in classification and potential behavior systems. The concepts of normal and abnormal will be explored especially when attempting to understand the behaviors of culturally diverse groups. The symptomatological disorders, including borderline personalities, and various phobic and obsessive-compulsive syndromes will be studied. Also covered will be dis-compensation, stress, anxiety, and defense. PREREQUISITES: None

PSY516 - Issues and Ethics in Psychology (3)

The purpose of this course is to acquaint the student with the major issues in the practice of psychology. The course will involve an intense analysis of the philosophical, technical, and consultative issues contributing to the professional identity and function of the psychologist in a public school or clinical setting. Emphasis will be placed on the setting, the practical application of theory, and the demands placed on the setting, the practical application of theory, and the demands placed on the practicing school psychologist. This course stresses professional ethics and general standards of conduct. The guide for this section of the course is the American Psychological Associations Code of Ethics. PREREQUISITES: None

PSY517 - Theories of Learning Disabilities (3)

This course is designed to familiarize the student with the field of learning disabilities and acquaint students with the various concepts of learning disability and the changing and developing perspectives during the past 20 years. Included will be a review and evaluation of the evidence for the existence of a social learning disability and nonverbal learning disabilities. The evidence for a neurological basis of learning disabilities is explored. Definitions and terms are introduced and discussed. Particular emphasis is placed on the concept that a learning disability is not a single entity that will respond to a single remedial strategy, but exists rather as a multi-dimensional phenomenon basically occurring in the context of school-related tasks. PREREQUISITES: None

PSY519 - Theoretical Basis for School Counseling Practice (3)

This course will provide students with a broad, integrated perspective on the discipline of psychology and its practice. Students will begin with an overview of the philosophical ideas from which psychology developed. Major theoretical positions in psychology will be explored from an historical perspective moving to the present positions and focusing on current practice. These include: Structuralism, Functionalism, Behaviorism, Gestalt, Psychoanalysis, Social Learning, Information Processing, and Cognitive models. Emphasis is placed on the educational and clinical implications of these basic positions. The neurological basis of learning and memory will be considered also. The student will develop an understanding of current trends in practice through a basic understanding of the theoretical foundations of psychology.

PSY521 - Family Counseling (3)

This course will provide students with a solid basis in General Systems Theory. Coverage will include theories and techniques that could be used by the psychologist in dealing with the family. Topics will include initial interview skills, therapeutic intervention techniques, and the application of systems theory to the family setting. Included will be usefulness and application of theory to culturally diverse groups, single parent, and blended families. PREREQUISITES: None

PSY523 - Child and Adolescent Development (3)

This course is designed to give the students general knowledge of the typical course of development in children and adolescents in the major areas: physical, cognitive, and social-emotional. The ages from 3 to 21 will be the focus of the information provided in this course since teachers, school counselors, and school psychologists work within this age group primarily. The relative contribution of heredity and environment are considered when describing and explaining behavior. Specific focus is on the impact of early childhood education, poverty, abuse, and technology on development as well as on the education process. Cultural, English language learning and socioeconomic factors are also addressed within the context of contemporary times.

PSY525 - Advanced Counseling Theory and Practice II (3)

The purpose of this course is to continue to have school counselors develop the psychological, behavioral, and therapeutic skills in order to provide basic counseling services to students in elementary, middle, and high school. Emphasis will be on the practical strategies to help students with problems such as depression and anxiety that are consistent in most student issues such as academic underachievement, peer relationship problems, cultural differences, emotional disorders, and the issues of homosexual and bisexual youth.

PSY531 - Pre-Internship Clinical Practicum I (Two Semesters) (6)

This course provides students with a yearlong opportunity (100 hours) to put their acquired academic knowledge of psychology and counseling into clinical practice prior to their final years internship, when they actually work with clients. This course is normally undertaken in the second year of the program and after PSY425. The practicum is utilized, in part, to meet the requirements for certification as a mental health counselor. In addition to developing counseling skills through the readings and exercises in the textbook, students also role-play counseling in the classroom and on audio and videotapes. Students explore their specific career interests and search for sites for the following year's internship experiences. PREREQUISITES: PSY425 and second year status

PSY532 - Psychopharmacology and Substance Abuse (3)

This course covers the fundamental principles of pharmacology, drug actions, tolerance, addiction, clinical use of psychotic medications, substance abuse, and addiction treatment. Research that explores the efficacy of medications taken during treatment, specific treatment programs, and the degree of recidivism is presented. PREREQUISITES: None

PSY540 - Clinical Internship (Two semesters) (9)

This course is primarily an off-campus, supervised work experience, extending from September to May and involving 16-20 hours per week. Practica are undertaken in the final year of the program, with approval of the clinical faculty. On-campus weekly meetings are required and are an integral part of the necessary supervision. All aspects of clinical experience from intake to discharge are acceptable with primary emphasis on face-to-face counseling interaction. May be repeated for up to nine credits. PREREQUISITES: Permission of program director

PSY550 - Practicum in Psychology - School Psychology (3)

The purpose of the practicum is to provide experience for the student in a school and/or clinical setting. The student is offered an opportunity to apply skills gained from course work in actual practice of psychology. The student works under the direct supervision of a certified or licensed psychologist with the assistance of a college adviser. The adviser helps the student to develop appropriate goals, to effectively use interpersonal skills, and to determine the areas to be further developed. Periodic group meetings are held with the college supervisor in order to provide additional academic information and to discuss practical experiences. PREREQUISITES: Completion of all course requirements

PSY551 - Practicum in Psychology - Mental Health (3)

The purpose of the practicum is to provide experience for the student in a clinical setting. The student is offered an opportunity to apply skills gained from course work to clinical practice. The student works under the direct supervision of a certified or licensed psychologist with the assistance of a college supervisor. The student is encouraged to develop goals, interpersonal skills, and to determine any individual framework. Periodic campus meetings are held with the college supervisor. PREREQUISITES: Completion of all course requirements

PSY558 - Therapeutic Techniques and Consultation (3)

This course will provide students with techniques to integrate the theories of treatment into specific situations that the counselor or psychologist will confront in actual practice. Topics will range from working with clients in multiple system membership to consultation around behavioral/emotional issues in schools as well as clinics. The consultation model will be considered as it relates to counselors and psychologists within a multicultural model. PREREQUISITES: PSY515

PSY560 - Practicum in School Adjustment Counseling (6)

The purpose of the practicum is to provide a culminating experience for the student in a school and/or clinical setting. The student is offered an opportunity to apply skills gained from course work in actual practice of school adjustment counseling. The student works under the direct supervision of a certified or licensed school adjustment counselor with the assistance of a college advisor. The advisor helps the student to develop appropriate goals, to effectively use interpersonal skills, and to determine the areas to be further developed. A weekly seminar class is considered to be component of the practicum in order to provide additional academic information and to discuss practical experiences. The practicum is 900 clock hours (six credits). At this point, the student is employable as a school adjustment counselor, and works independently with mentorship and college supervision. PREREQUISITES: Completion of all course requirements

PSY580 - Principles in Forensic Psychology (3)

This course will provide students with information about the various forensic activities in which psychologists and other related professionals currently participate. Activities may include competency evaluations, assessment of violent behavior and dangerousness, child abuse/neglect, treatment issues, court testimony, police psychology, and consultation to judges, attorneys, and other law enforcement personnel. Students will obtain information about the numerous roles of professionals in the field of forensic psychology and will develop the skills and knowledge base that will prepare them to continue with specialized training in this area. PREREQUISITES: None

PSY581 - Independent Study in Forensic Psychology (3)

In this course, a student pursues, in-depth, an individualized program of reading and/or research with a specific faculty member. PREREQUISITES: Permission of department chair

PSY585 - Assessment Techniques in Forensic Psychology (3)

This course will familiarize students with the particulars of forensic assessment and test administration and will deal with techniques of synthesizing and integrating psychological and practical information into an effective forensic report. Emphasis will be placed on formal and informal assessment techniques, presenting problems, presentation of reports, and collaboration with other professionals. Students will develop skills in the assessment and diagnosis of disorders commonly found in forensic settings. PREREQUISITES: PSY580

PSY590 - Externship in Forensic Psychology (3)

This course is primarily an off-campus supervised work experience in a forensic setting involving approximately 15 hours per week for an academic semester. All externships are usually undertaken during the final year of the program with approval of the program director. One hour of direct on-site supervision is required and will optimally be provided by a licensed/certified mental health professional. On-campus meetings are also required and are an integral part of the supervision process. All forensic experiences, broadly defined, will be considered as acceptable placements. PREREQUISITES: Permission of department chair

PSY604A - Clinical Experience in School Adjustment (6)

The purpose of the clinical experience is to provide a culminating experience for the student under the direct mentorship of a licensed school adjustment counselor or licensed guidance counselor with assistance from a college supervisor. The student is provided an opportunity to develop and to apply skills gained from course work to actual practice as a school counselor. The advisor and mentor help the student to develop appropriate goals, to effectively use interpersonal skills, counseling skills, consultation skills, and to determine areas to be further developed. The student is expected to take significant responsibility in developing independence in the application of skills and must demonstrate competence by meeting performance goals. At least one-half of the clinical experience must be completed in a school setting. Since the student must qualify for an initial license before beginning the clinical experience, this experience may be done on the job and is necessary for the professional license. PREREQUISITES: Permission of the program director

PSY604B - Clinical Experience in Guidance (6)

The purpose of the clinical experience is to provide a culminating experience for the student under the direct mentorship of a licensed school adjustment counselor or licensed guidance counselor with assistance from a college supervisor. The student is provided an opportunity to develop and to apply skills gained from course work to actual practice as a school counselor. The advisor and mentor help the student to develop appropriate goals, to effectively use interpersonal skills, counseling skills, and consultation skills, and to determine areas to be further developed. The student is expected to take significant responsibility in developing independence in the application of skills, and must demonstrate competence by meeting performance goals. At least one-half of the clinical experience must be completed

PSY614 - Psychology of Development (3)

This course addresses the physical, cognitive, and social-emotional development of children, adolescents, adults, and the elderly, including a description of behaviors that are present at the various stages, and explanations for those behaviors in terms of relative contributions of heredity and environment. The sociocultural and social economic factors that may contribute to a development outcome are considered. PREREQUISITES: None

PSY615 - Social Bases of Behavior (3)

This course covers a number of advanced topics in the general area of social psychology, including cultural, ethnic, and group processes, sex roles, organizational behavior, group dynamics, status and role, attribution theory, and leadership. Special emphasis will also be placed on cultural diversity, including those issues related to racial and ethnic bases of behavior, with a focus on people of color. PREREQUISITES: None

PSY620 - Racial and Ethnic Bases of Behavior (3)

This course emphasizes cultural diversity, especially regarding persons of color. The focus is on the impact of cultural diversity on psychological health and growth. The students will be involved in becoming familiar with the challenges and opportunities presented by a diverse culture. Although the emphasis will be on persons of color, coverage will also include diversity in other areas, such as gender, socioeconomic class, and cultural background. PREREQUISITES: None

PSY630 - Pre-doctoral Internship - School Psychology (two semesters) (6)

Supervised experience in psychotherapeutic and assessment procedures in an approved clinical facility. Includes seminars and case conferences and must be supervised by a licensed clinical psychologist. The internship may be selected after the student has completed 60 credit hours of doctoral work and involves 16 to 20 hours a week. On campus meetings are also required as a key part of the supervision. Additional requirements may apply. PREREQUISITES: Advanced standing and permission of department chair

PSY631 - Pre-doctoral Internship - Mental Health (two semesters) (6)

Supervised experience in psychotherapeutic and assessment procedures in an approved clinical facility. Includes seminars and case conferences and must be supervised by a licensed clinical psychologist. The internship may be selected after the student has completed 60 credit hours of doctoral work and involves 16 to 20 hours a week. On-campus meetings are also required as a key part of the supervision. Additional requirements may apply. PREREQUISITES: Advanced standing and permission of department chair

PSY657 - Psychology of Exceptional Children (3)

Exceptional children are those for whom special educational programming is considered necessary. In this course, we consider the characteristics, prevalence, etiology, neurological correlates (if applicable), developmental course, assessment, and treatment for the categories of learning disabilities (including reading disability and nonverbal LD), ADHD, Aspergers syndrome, children with limited English proficiency, children from culturally diverse backgrounds, and the gifted and talented. PREREQUISITES: None

PSY751 - Psychology Systems and Theories (3)

This course includes advanced and comprehensive studies focused on the major models and theories of psychology, with a specific focus on the historical western philosophers and philosophies and subsequent theorists and theories that provide the foundations of the established models of modern psychological schools of thought and paradigms.

PSY752 - Advanced Theories of Learning and Behavior (3)

This course includes studies of the principles and theories of learning and behavior including functionalist, associative and cognitive approaches; and current research and practical applications of learning theories in clinical, educational and other applied settings.

PSY753 - Advanced Abnormal Psychology (3)

This course focuses on psychopathology and includes studies of the etiology and categorization of psychopathology; historical, sociopolitical, cultural, behavioral and epidemiological approaches to the systematic description of psychological disorders; use of the DSM-IV-TR in differential diagnosis; potential alternatives to the existing system; and the roles of assessment, treatment planning and intervention for psychological disorders.

PSY754 - Principles of Psychological Assessment, Tests, & Measurement (3)

This course focuses on the study of theory and practice of appraisal, including issues of reliability and validity; evaluation procedures and test administration, as well as clinical and practical aspects of individual and educational testing and clinical diagnosis; integration and interpretation of data from a variety of appraisal procedures; report writing; and the professional communication of appraisal results. It includes legal, ethical and social/cultural issues related to the appropriate use of major instruments for evaluating intelligence, aptitude, achievement, personality and neurological conditions; and computer-managed and computer-assisted methods.

PSY755 - Advanced Counseling Theories and Practice (3)

This course focuses on the study of theory and practice of appraisal, including issues of reliability and validity; evaluation procedures and test administration, as well as clinical and practical aspects of individual and educational testing and clinical diagnosis; integration and interpretation of data from a variety of appraisal procedures; report writing; and the professional communication of appraisal results. It includes legal, ethical and social/cultural issues related to the appropriate use of major instruments for evaluating intelligence, aptitude, achievement, personality and neurological conditions; and computer-managed and computer-assisted methods.

PSY850 - Advanced Topics in Adult development (3)

This course focuses on issues and theories of adult development, especially within the context of established psychological and related developmental theories and models. Course content is designed to support professional work with adults through understanding of theories of adult development, life course issues and cultural and biological issues in aging.

PSY851 - Advanced Topics in Child and Adolescent Development (3)

This course focuses on theories and applications of child and adolescent development. Special emphasis is placed on understanding childhood and adolescent developmental processes from holistic perspectives integrating established theories of biological, cognitive, emotional/psychological, moral, and psycho-social development.

PSY852 - Advanced Topics in Emotional Development (3)

This course focuses on developing one's understanding of child, adolescent, and adult emotional development, especially within the context of established psychological and related developmental theories and models. Special emphasis is placed on understanding emotional development and processes from holistic perspectives integrating established theories of biological, cognitive, emotional/psychological, moral, and psycho-social development.

PSY853 - Advanced Topics in Personality Theory and Development (3)

This course includes exploration of the theories, dynamics and processes of personality; the nature and causes of the personality proposed by major personality theorists; various modes of practice derived from psychoanalytic/psychodynamic, psychophysiological, behavioral, cognitive, humanistic, and existential theoretical paradigms; and the symptomologies of major psychiatric disorders; and use of the DSM-IV-TR in practice.

PSY854 - Advanced Topics in Family Therapy (3)

This course focuses on the history, theory and practice of family therapy, with analysis and comparison of beliefs, therapeutic strategies, and techniques of the most prominent approaches. It includes the study of differences between individual and systems approaches to helping families and the use of the genogram in family therapy, as well as the role and functions of a family therapist.

PSY855 - Advanced Topics in Group Therapy (3)

This course includes advanced studies of theoretical approaches to and key concepts of group counseling and their practical applications. It focuses on the elements of group dynamics and process; group counseling methods; strategies and skills; historical and cultural contexts in which models were developed; leadership styles and practicalities of creating and leading groups.

PSY856 - Nutrition and Emotional Wellness Connections (3)

This course focuses on understanding the psychological processes underlying humans' development of eating behaviors and the adoption of both healthy and maladaptive cognitions and behaviors concerning food, eating, and our bodies. Issues to be addressed include: food choice, the development of food preferences, motivation to eat, cultural influences on eating patterns, weight-regulation, body image, dieting behaviors, obesity, eating disorders, and treatment of unhealthy and clinical eating problems. The psychology (not physiological processes) of eating will be emphasized, and psychological problems associated with eating will be thoroughly discussed. Areas of examination include anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, compulsive eating, obesity, and weight preoccupation; discussion of cultural and nutritional factors, family issues, and psychological consequences, as well as preventative and therapeutic interventions. Nutritional needs & food choices for optimal health of individuals across the lifespan and Interrelationship with wellness are also explored.

PSY857 - Psychology of Wellness Applications (3)

Course Description: This course incorporates the traditional evidenced based applications and goals of a psychology of well-being (getting rid of negatives and dealing with ordinary challenges), as well focusing on current methods in Positive Psychology that emphasize growth and excellence. Positive Psychology is the study of how human beings prosper and overcome adversity. Its goal is to identify and enhance human strengths and virtues and allow individuals and communities to thrive.

PSY858 - Psychology of Mind/Body Connections (3)

This course examines basic psychological processes that influence health and illness including perceived control, stress, behavioral conditioning, factors that influence behavioral change, self-efficacy and social support. It examines specific behaviors, illnesses, and physical conditions that are part of the behavioral medicine domain, including: obesity, smoking, cancer, HIV, and hypertension. This course also considers learners holistic approaches to stress management, looking at both cognitive skills and relaxation techniques.

PSY860 - Clinical Pharmacology: Considerations for Health & Wellness (3)

This course is designed to prepare learners to provide guidance and support to clients whose treatment currently includes or might include pharmacotherapy. The purposes, advantages and limitations of specific medications and how to evaluate the usefulness of various medications in conjunction with other treatment approaches will be covered, to include latest information on the effects of psychotropic medications on various groups including children, the elderly, women and different racial and ethnic populations.

PSY862 - Principles of Brain Based Learning (3)

This course offers advanced studies of theoretical approaches to and key concepts of brain based learning and their practical applications to applied psychology and education. It integrates cross-disciplinary research in the neurosciences, cognitive psychology, neuropsychology, and education to provide learners with solid empirical foundations of current theories and models of brain based earning principles.

PSY863 - Biological Psychology and Biological Basis of Behavior (3)

This course focuses on the gross anatomy of the nervous system and the basic relationships between the brain, chemical neurotransmitters and behavior; right and left hemisphere specialization; learning disorders and learning style differences; relationships between neurotransmitters and psychiatric disorders; biological bases of memory systems and retrieval processes including long-term, short-term, episodic and semantic memory.

PSY864 - Cognitive Psychology and Cognitive Functions (3)

This course covers cognitive neuroscience, attention and consciousness, perception, memory, knowledge, representation, language, problem solving and creativity, decision making and reasoning, cognitive development, and intelligence. Students will research theories, models, and scientists from many disciplines, including physics, chemistry, biology, and neuroscience, which contribute to the study of cognition and cognitive science. The course will present from a premise that cognitive psychology, the science of the human mind and of how people process information, is at the core of empirical investigations into the nature of mind and thought, and that cognitive psychology is at heart empirical philosophy. Students will research, assimilate, and understand core questions about thought, language, perception, memory, and knowledge.

PSY900 - Cognitive Psychology (3)

This course will provide students with an intensive analysis of cognitive functioning. Different paradigms of information processing, especially those that are developmentally related, will be reviewed with emphasis on cognitive development and assessment. PREREQUISITES: None

PSY911 - Multivariate Research Methods (3)

The focus in this course is on the practical problems involved in real-world research. Topics covered include the nature of causal inference, validity of instruments and design, experimental and quasi-experimental field-based research approaches, design development, and problems involved in the statistical analysis of data obtained from complex design.

PSY920 - The Physiological Basis of Behavior (3)

Introduction to the gross and microscopic anatomy of the central nervous system and to the physiology of the nerve impulse and synaptic transmission. The course reviews the relationship of behavior to the nervous system on such chemical factors as hormones and neural transmitters. A term project is assigned for which the student prepares a paper, lecture, videotape, audio tape, or any combination of these dealing with the physiological correlates of any behavior. PREREQUISITES: None

PSY998 - Directed Study in Learning Disabilities (3)

This course is designed to allow doctoral students the opportunity to explore a single topic in greater detail than might be possible in other courses. This course is only open to doctoral students with advanced standing, who, because of past experience, can demonstrate competence in up to two non-comprehensive exam courses. Under such circumstances, these courses would be waived, and the directed study used in their place. Lab fee is at the discretion of the instructor. PREREQUISITES: None

PSY999 - Dissertation in Educational Psychology (12)

Limited to candidates for the Doctor of Educational Psychology degree who have successfully completed the comprehensive examination. PREREQUISITES: Completion of all course requirements